Tag Archives: malham

Pennine Way – Day 14 – Malham to East Marton (or Rain, Rain, Rain, Rain, Rain)

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To the rescue
To the rescue

Knowing that Hannah was coming to visit I had been able to book accommodation outside the immediate vicinity of Malham. However, never being wholly satisfied that Hannah won’t get a last minute High Court injunction I’d had to book somewhere on the path (6 miles away in Gargrave) we had a great evening in a lovely room at the Mason’s Arms and she was able to drive me back to meet dad in Malham for a decent start around 10 am.

Cow goes moo, sheep goes baa
Cow goes moo, sheep goes baa

Today was a rest day of sorts and it absolutely threw it down. We only had ten limes to do and so thus needing less water than might normally be the case and having to wear our waterproofs due to the deluge I decided to leave my rucsack in the car with Hannah. A lead my father seemed happy to follow.

The end of the BGFA
The end of the BGFA

It briefly stopped raining as we reached the BGFA limit. I assume this has something to do with a fishing association. It being a Saturday on fairly flat terrain but with nice views up at Malham we expected to see a number of other walkers though the number we saw was quite unexpectedly large! We would later pass a church hall with a LDWA sign in front of it┬ánear Gargrave so I assume that it was the “Long Distance Walkers Association” and that they all came from there.

We spin cotton.
We spin cotton.

What I found really odd though was that they all had their own maps and didn’t seem to be following each other which, for such a large group, seemed quite redundant. I suppose there would always be the risk that the person you happened to follow would not be part of your group and you would end up off in the middle of nowhere but that seems highly unlikely.

Can you see the path.
Can you see the path.

I was, however, once again very happy for GPS for we fell off the path several times as there was often a requirement to get from one side of a field to another with little to no information to guide you, or worse a false friend like this which was a completely different path that was clearly followed by many of the other not using a GPS.

A rising lock lifts all boats.
A rising lock lifts all boats.

We arrived at East Marton in time for a delicious lunch though sadly Hannah had not grabbed us a table by the fire and so we ate it without really drying out. However, the staff were kind enough to let us put our boots out to dry in front of the fire. Of course this would prove to be unnecessary.

Uh-oh
Uh-oh

Trying to find somewhere to stay for a Saturday night in so tourist friendly a part of the world as Malham with only a days notice is not very sensible and in fact is likely to leave you unable to find anywhere. Fortunately as Hannah was staying I was prepared to splash out on a little bit of luxury and Ponden Hall was found.

Have we stumbled into a palace?
Have we stumbled into a palace?

The rooms were huge and my and Hannah’s room even had a “box bed” which made it feel much more like a sitting room than a bedroom. Both rooms had delightful wood burners and the owners were very friendly even lending Hannah and I a chess board on which Hannah beat me. When we arrived they even invited us down to eat some cake and have a chat – really a most delightful place to spend the rest of our rest day.

Has, has Hannah won?
Has, has Hannah won?

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Pennine Way – Day 13 – Horton-in-Ribblesdale to Malham (or up, wind, up, tarn, cove)

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Can you see the face?
Can you see the face?

Perhaps it should have been obvious but having got to the Golden Lion and having had a shower dad was happy to attempt to continue. Given that all the remaining days until the last two are much easier than our previous days I can see no way that we will now fail to complete the walk. Of course we have not yet had any bad weather and perhaps this will dampen our spirits.

A long way down.
A long way down.

Exactly as I remember it the path up Pen-y-ghent was essentially immaculate. I recall with some clarity that when we arrived at Horton-in-Ribblesdale 10 years ago that from here it would surely be easy and that we were only giving up due to the pending start of term in Cambridge. I suspect that this opinion was made much easier by the lack of a requirement to actually complete the walk.

We claim this hill, for Yorkshire ...
We claim this hill, for Yorkshire …

For some reason I thought it would be fun to carry a Yorkshire flag around with me on this walk. I had only had it out on the first day so far and having decided to continue past our obvious break point it felt like a good day to get it out again.

PATH!
PATH! But then another hill.

At the top of the hill the wind was substantial but it was but nothing compared to how it was on the way down. The side down which we were climbing was, of course, the usual ascent side and it was quite a scramble. When climbing up almost shear rock one is not in much danger as a fall forwards would be not very far at all but coming down it feels quite unstable. Though as hard as it was it was but nothing compared to the difficulty one person was having as they attempted to carry their rather large and rather rugged looking mountain bike up the side of the hill for their first attempt at off road cycling!

Conservative Party Logo?
Conservative Party Logo?

Once we were over the days two hills the scenery really opened out at the countryside was very beautiful. One thing that can not really pass without comment was the number of people who appeared to be walking their dogs. “I’m just popping up Pen-y-ghent to stretch the dogs legs,” must be a common refrain in the houses of Ribblesdale but it seems like total madness to me.

An idyllic path
An idyllic path

The final approach up to Malham is through some rather well maintained national trust property. With weather like we had it looks particularly splendid. There was even a couple of people out on the Tarn in a little boat, though I imagine they were scientists from the nearby research centre.

An Idyllic cove
An idyllic tarn

Sadly once past the tarn it is a real scramble round to the cove. Despite being very clearly a vibrant tourist attraction it would seem that the tourist mainly drive between the Tarn and the Cove for the path seemed almost impassible in places. Our progress was excessively slow. But we did eventually get there and after looking around for a path marked on the map that must actually be straight down the cove crossed the cove and headed for Malham.

An idyllic cove
An idyllic cove

Down the cove and we were in Malham. Dad was satying in the youth hostel tonight (which along with everywhere else was full) but they were kind enough to let me shower there before I met Hannah. (Who was meeting us in Malham tonight!) which had the distinct advantage of leaving me smelling almost tolerable so we were able to enjoy a nice dinner in Malham rather than rushing off to the place we were staying 6 miles down the road!

An idyllic extinct waterfall
An idyllic extinct waterfall

Does walking the Pennine Way look hard to you? Well why not sponsor me here!