Tag Archives: Torside

Pennine Way – Day 19 – Torside to Edale (or Lost, Mist, Bog, Flags, Fin)

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Wondering aimlessly
Wondering aimlessly

As much as possible I have tried to avoid the weather forecast, after all it wouldn’t make any difference – we’d still have to head out – but at the weekend I did see a forecast in the Daily Mail which suggested that Manchester would have thunderstorms on Thursday. I was very glad to see that this didn’t happen.

A sign!
A sign!

The host at the Old House explained a “short cut” which would allow us to avoid going down about 20m before coming back up and we attempted to follow his instructions. This was a mistake. Later it would transpire that his instructions were sound but having thus far only followed our little blue line on the SatNav it seems we had lost any ability to live with out it. In frustration at one point I stormed off through the tussocks and fell over fortunately I did not twist my ankle (it would have been galling to fail on the very last day!) and we eventually made our way to the path.

Bog.
Bog.

The mist was probably the thickest we have had (even thicker than that which hid the Stooley Pike Monument) and there were no identifying features to be seen from the top of the hill. Climbing up towards the Snake Pass was difficult and the path was surprisingly difficult to find in places. At the top of the first peak we stopped for a brief lunch break and even with the GPS we managed to set off in the wrong direction! When we eventually found our way back to the path (which involved crossing the same stream at least twice) it was as a portion of flags were ending (which was greatly disheartening).

Three miles of flags!
Three miles of flags!

The American couple which we had met last night were planning to walk back from Edale and if they were to make it to Torside we would have expected to meet them somewhere around the Snake Pass though they were Alas no where to be seen. Once over the Snake Pass there began a beautiful path of flags which must be the longest single stretch that we have walked these last 19 days. It probably also represented the single greatest distance we ever covered in an hour some 2.8 miles.

Oooo a gap!
Oooo a gap!

The end of flags presented a reasonable time to have lunch even though it was at the foot of quite a steep hill. From a distance of about a quarter mile we saw a large party that were clearly out for the day on an organised walk who scrambled down the hill we were soon to travel and then stopped for their own lunch. I’m quite sure I saw one of them nipping round a hillock for a ‘wild one’ but of course from such a distance it was impossible to tell. I am certainly glad to have avoided the need for such activity and having deliberately chosen not to have a curry last night felt confident that I would avoid the need all the way to the end.

Goodbye flags.
Goodbye flags.

Scrambling up the hill was a bit tricky but as this was the last real climb of the walk it seemed to go by without too much difficult and once at the top dad had “remembered” that there was a “good path”. He was completely mistaken. While it wasn’t boggy there was no really discernible path and there were lots of quite big stones which made the going slow and cumbersome.

More moreland
More moreland

As we approached the waterfall below (which had some how created quite a large gouge in the rock) we did meet the American couple from last night. We recommended that they come off at the Snake Pass as if they carried on to Torside they would not make it until very late on in the day and would not be hugely enjoyable. They’d had some trouble with the mist (unsurprisingly). From where we met them, however, they were about to enter an area with some phone signal and the hosts at The Old House seem happy to come and pick one up from the Snake Pass so I am sure they got home safely.

A large detour for a small waterfall
A large detour for a small waterfall

I’m not totally convinced that the ridge we were walking on was anything other than dead flat but we did eventually make it to a place that the Ordnance Survey had satisfied themselves was an appropriate place for building a trig point and it seemed like a good place to break for our final second lunch. I am certainly going to miss second lunch once I return to Normalcy.

Atop our last hill.
Atop our last hill.

Well almost.
Well almost.

Now it was a simple matter of getting down in to Edale. Foolishly we decided to take the old pony track around Jacob’s ladder (a decision I think we also made ten years ago) only to see that someone had neatly arranged for there to be what looked like quite well maintained steps up the side. I can never decide what is the best thing to do as the “official” way went they way we went but it probably added a half mile and a good fifteen minutes compared to the alternative of going straight down the steps. Today being longer than we had walked for the last few days I was starting to feel really rather tired but from here to almost the end the path is exceptionally well maintained.

Jacobs Ladder
Jacobs Ladder

Arriving at the end was some relief. We had done it. I think my fathers ephiphany that Wainwright was infact simply a drunk who stumbled from pub to pub seemed rather apt as we drank our final pint and munched on our crisps before heading off to the station. When we set off I really did not expect that we should make it and I am confident that more preparation (especially on my father’s part) would have been a good investment. However, having said that we made it to the end and in only 18 days 10 hours 22 minutes and 13 seconds which I think is pretty good going really.

Journey's end
Journey’s end

Wait, have we come the wrong way?
Wait, have we come the wrong way?

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Pennine Way – Day 18 – Standedge to Torside (or Path, Resevoir, View, Flags, Tunnel)

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How did we get so lost last time?
How did we get so lost last time?

When we attempted the walk 10 years ago this journey was effectively the end of our contiguous endeavour. We must have gone wrong somewhere but starting off from this direction the path seems to be such a very well made track that is hard to conceive how we can have gone so wrong!

120 yds to the M11!?
120 yds to the M11!?

I certainly have no recollection of seeing this stone. Though I am rather confused by its contents. Advising, as it does, that we are about 120 yards from the M11. The GPS advised our course very well and we made a great deal of progress and I was optimistic that we might even make it to Torside while they were serving tea. Sadly it soon became obvious that it was not likely.

Looks like a nice path on the otherside.
Looks like a nice path on the other side.

One of the harder choices was whether to follow the Pennine Way down this ravine to make it to this delightful looking path on the other side or to continue along the current contour to join the way at the end of the first reservoir. A conversation at breakfast suggest that perhaps this later choice may be an earlier version of the Pennine Way and I wonder if it is possible that this could be where we went wrong all those years ago as once on the well made up path it continues on beautifully to the top of the hill where my father is sure that we stopped for a bacon roll at a burger van a little before noon all that time ago.

Framing the view.
Framing the view.

Sadly this time we clearly arrived just too late for the burger van (if the burger van still visits the lay-by) but it was around noon and so a good time for lunch. We stooped just over a wall and oddly a group of youths drove up this lay-by and asked my father to take a picture of them (clearly we had stopped to close to the road) which they then followed with some public urination and wild gesticulation and shouting at any that should come past.

The view over Holmfirth
The view over Holmfirth

The view from the top of this hill was really quite something and the pictures don’t do it justice. What looks like a much larger conurbation than I recall Holmfirth being was to be seen in the far distance dominated by a large tower which is barely visible in this picture. At the trig point was a good point to stop for second lunch and we met a couple who were walking the way together. The husband had done it before about 25 years ago for a meagre £25 and was bringing his wife along with him this time. I’m not sure if they will make it the whole way but they are camping and so able to stop at fairly regular intervals which may mean it takes them some time. I don’t really remember much of what it was like 10 years ago but my father reminisced with them about when the hill had really deserved its name of black moss and how well it had taken to grassing over the years since.

Torside approaches
Torside approaches

When we first got over the final hill of the day it seemed that we would soon be at Crowden. However, a quick perusal of the map soon put an end to any such hopes since even from Crowden it was another mile and a half to Torside. (Though this means we are left with a much tolerable 15.97 miles tomorrow). Today has generally been beautifully flagged though alas this last section seemed to have lots of difficult terrain between the sections of flags.

Endless flags!
Endless flags!

The Old House is a beautiful place to stay and they have transformed what used to be the guest lounge into a tea room with a large outdoor seating area. I think we technically arrived during the time when they are supposed to be open but with the end of the season approaching there was no-body else in. I later learned that they have a silent alarm on their gate so they are able to be more prepared if a paying guest arrived! They made us a delightful cup of tea (which felt well earned) and were good enough to sell me a slice of what was possibly the best rocky road I have ever tasted!

Overflowing gently.
Overflowing gently.

We also learned that the sneaky sock theives from Sheffield University are just generally careless having taken a jumper from their drying room. Though as it had been left behind by someone else I suppose it was technically abandoned and so isn’t really theft? The host was good enough to drive us down to a local pub where we good enjoy a tasty supper before having an early night a head of a long day tomorrow. Fortunately an American couple were staying for the ‘two day package’ and so we had the option to have breakfast at 0730.

A beautiful tunnel.
A beautiful tunnel.

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